Extra-extrovert

Being an extrovert helps brighten futures

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Extra-extrovert

Myah Hrinko, Photo Editor/Social Media Director

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An extrovert tends to thrive in the company of other people and constantly seeks new experiences, which is what people nowadays tend to forget the importance of. In life, you are forced to be social and communicate with other people in order to live and be successful.

Others often ask why many people are extroverts and are confused about how easy it is for some people to be so social. So many don’t even realize they are extroverts and how much being social has benefited them.

When it comes to life and the world we live in today, people don’t understand how important it is to try and socialize with their peers. Speaking out and standing out can lead up to a brighter future and social outlook for things such as jobs and future careers.

“When you are an extrovert, you immediately put yourself in a position to create more opportunities for yourself and get the full life experience,” junior Noah Valles said.

Normally being an outgoing individual accompanies significantly more encounters, prompting conceivably a more differed way of life than introverts; this happens mostly due to keeping an eye open to meet new individuals and opportunities. For example, extroverts tend to have an easier time getting into colleges and have a greater chance of achieving their goals. This all happens from doing simple things such as talking and holding a conversation with athletic coaches or professors.

The book “Brainstorm Psychology” states, “Extroverts generally have more doors opened for them due to the sheer amount of socializing they do and prefer being around the company of other people and being included in novelty or risk-taking situations.”  

It is very simple to be an extrovert when doing activities that force you to have to be social for example, sports such as soccer, basketball, football, track and even golf.

“I’ve always played sports and went out and would always be active so it was always very easy for me to be social and have fun with the sports I do with the friends I’m around,” Valles said.

In a new study, Duke University psychological scientists Korrina Duffy and Tanya Chartrand identified one key behavior that helps explain why and how extroverts are so socially adept: mimicry.

“Mimicry occurs when people unconsciously copy the body language, speech patterns or movements of those around them,” Duffy said.

Also, if a person surrounds themselves with outgoing and confident people they are more likely to be more comfortable being an extrovert.

“I think the people I surrounded myself with my whole life have definitely helped me come out of my shell and just live life, and I think some friends from my past have also made me want to become more outgoing,” Valles said.  

Being an extrovert is a great quality and will set those people up for success.

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