Previous senior project guidelines updated for future seniors

This+artwork+of+a+bulldog+with+a+graduation+cap+on+was+created+by+high+school+art+teacher+Kaylee+Haggerty+and+is+on+the+front+cover+of+every+senior+project+packet+that+all+the+upcoming+seniors+received.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Previous senior project guidelines updated for future seniors

This artwork of a bulldog with a graduation cap on was created by high school art teacher Kaylee Haggerty and is on the front cover of every senior project packet that all the upcoming seniors received.

This artwork of a bulldog with a graduation cap on was created by high school art teacher Kaylee Haggerty and is on the front cover of every senior project packet that all the upcoming seniors received.

This artwork of a bulldog with a graduation cap on was created by high school art teacher Kaylee Haggerty and is on the front cover of every senior project packet that all the upcoming seniors received.

This artwork of a bulldog with a graduation cap on was created by high school art teacher Kaylee Haggerty and is on the front cover of every senior project packet that all the upcoming seniors received.

Cade Skuse, Editor-In-Chief (Online)

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






In the past, seniors have always had to complete the senior project in order to graduate from Freedom. For their projects, seniors had to do at least 20 hours of community service, attend a government meeting and write a reflection about their high school career. This year, a few parts of the project has changed for the upcoming seniors next year. The project is no longer entitled “senior project,” but has a new name: “Graduation Project.”

The change to what was required was decided upon a committee made up of different faculty members, including assistant principal Steven Mott, English teacher Heather Giamarria and communication teacher Bradley Baldwin.

While the project requirement remains largely the same, a few new additions have been added to cover more bases with students, taking into account what students plan to do after they graduate from high school.

One of the biggest changes for seniors is that instead of being required to have 20 community service hours, students have another path they can choose. Students now have the option to host a fundraiser to benefit a charity of their choice. Fundraisers are expected to raise at least $250, and those that do not will instead be graded on a sliding scale. Since these fundraisers may prove to be a big undertaking, seniors will be allowed to work in groups of two or three in order to complete these fundraisers.

One more new major change is with how job shadowing and financial aid requirements will work. Based upon where a student is headed after graduation, a post-secondary school or entering the workforce, students will have different options.

For students who plan on attending a post-secondary school, students will be required to attend at least two post-secondary tours and have photographic evidence that must have them in the picture along with a unique place at that institution. Another new requirement is that seniors must attend the financial aid night that is being hosted at Freedom on Oct. 16, as well as apply for at least two scholarships. One returning requirement is that students must have one

job-shadow that was at least eight hours in length, as well as an interview with the person they are job-shadowing. Seniors must also have a complete cover letter and resumé.

For students who plan on entering the workforce, the requirements are slightly different. Students must have two job-shadows instead of the one required for other students. Seniors must also create a professional portfolio that will help them get a job after leaving high school. This portfolio is supposed to include a resumé and a cover letter, three letters of recommendation, photographic evidence of their career skill and a complete job information form for their chosen field.

In the past, in order for seniors to pass for distinction, they were required to have 30 community service hours instead of the required 20. In order to pass with distinction now, students are required to complete a self-development pathway. Students are allowed to choose a project that will help their personal education and development that should encourage learning and personal growth. Examples include personal fitness, learning a new language or learning to play an instrument. Students will then be required to type a three to five page reflection about what they learned throughout the course of their project.

Something that has remained the same between the new graduation project and the old senior project is that students are still required to attend a government meeting. This is one of the only sections that students are required to write a reflection for, which the new project requirements tried to stray away from.

Overall, the new graduation project has many changes that aimed to better prepare students for their life after graduating from high school. Whether a student plans on attending college or going straight into the workforce, all areas are planned to be covered. Students will have all summer and next school year in order to complete the graduation project before presenting for one day in May 2020.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email